FAQ


Are your products kid safe?

Yes, our products are safe to use on children older than 6 months of age.  In fact zinc oxide is
one of the ingredients The Skin Cancer Foundation recommends parents look for in the sunscreens they buy.

Does your sunscreen contain nano-particles?

We have checked with our chemists in order to give you the most accurate information on nano-particles and all of our products are free of them.  In December of 2008 Consumer Reports Health did tests on five brands of sunscreen including Zinka.  We were the only company out of the five that was nano-particle free.  Check out their website at www.consumerreports.org to get more in depth information on the test.

Here is some more info on the concerns with nano-particles:

There has been speculation that physical sunscreen ingredients, like zinc oxide and titanium dioxide release nano-particles into the water.  When these particles settle, they can clog the pores of marine life like coral.  There is no conclusive data on this that I am aware of.

The self proclaimed "Environmental Working Group" publishes reports that basically associate something bad with every ingredient used for sunscreen.  If they don't someone else will.  There are no confirmed results of their findings.  Some believe the FDA doesn't regulate sunscreen, however that is completely false.  They pre-approve and publish a list of ingredients that can and can't be used in sunscreens.  If they deem an ingredient to be harmful then it will be removed.  These studies are inconclusive and don't take levels of percentages into play.  It is common knowledge to most that there have always been things that are healthy in certain doses and potentially not in large amount.

There will always be someone who says something is wrong with everything... 6 months later, they will change their mind to focus their attention on something else.  There is a lot of money spent behind the scenes by influential companies to try and swing customer perception towards their products and their respective ingredients.  This is very apparent when everyone was convinced that Mexoryl was the greatest thing to ever hit the US.  What they didn't advertise is the fact that it is impossible to stabilize it in a waterproof solution, so it's basically useless.  The latest buzz word that they are pounding is Helioplex.  This is just a combination of two active ingredients that are commonly found in a number of existing formulas... They basically just made up a new fancy word for something that has been used for a long time.

In conclusion, you will never satisfy 100% of the market and it is very expensive to try.  You need to be confident with your formula, the way it wears and its overall performance.  We have always operated under the notion that the most effective sunscreen is one that someone will actually wear.  It doesn't matter what a sunscreen contains or does if nobody will apply it because it feels like mud.  The notion that wearing no sunscreen at all is better than wearing certain sunscreens is absolutely ridiculous.  The market changes and so do the buzz words.

For what it's worth.. if you bottle a formula without nano-particles, then another contingent of people will complain that it doesn't have a physical block.  So far, it has proven impossible to please everyone with a single formula because someone is always coming out with a new test that says you should or shouldn't be doing on thing or another.

How do I get my Nosecoat off my face?

Since it is water-resistant Zinka Nosecoat won't just wash off with water.  The best thing to use is
baby wipes.  If you don't have any wipes then a paper towel or cloth towel will work well too.

How do I get Nosecoat out of clothes?

Soak the garment in OxiClean and then run it through the wash.

Is the Nosecoat tube the same color as the sunscreen?

Yes, the color of the Nosecoat tube is the color of the sunscreen.

SPF Ratings are confusing. How much coverage am I getting with different SPF's?

SPF# SPF 15 SPF 30 SPF 50
% of UVB rays being
screened out.
93% 97% 98%

UVA Rays:

Penetrate deeper layers of the skin, damage collagen and cause wrinkling and leathering of the skin.
UVA rays also penetrate glass, even car windows.

UVB Rays:

Are the principal cause of reddening of the skin and sunburn, which can lead to melanoma (the most advanced case of skin cancer) and direct DNA damage.  UVB rays are the strongest from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., but they can burn and damage the skin year round especially in higher altitudes.

What are the ingredients in your products?

Flesh Nosecoat

PETROLATUM, ZINC OXIDE, BEESWAX,
PARAFFIN, MINERAL OIL, TITANIUM DIOXIDE, BHA,
FRAGRANCE, IRON OXIDES (CI 77489)



Pink Nosecoat

PETROLATUM, ZINC OXIDE, BEESWAX,
PARAFFIN, MINERAL OIL, TITANIUM DIOXIDE, BHA,
FRAGRANCE, RED 6 LAKE (CI 15850), RED 7 LAKE (CI 15850),
ULTRAMARINES (CI 77007)



Blue Nosecoat

PETROLATUM, ZINC OXIDE, BEESWAX,
PARAFFIN, MINERAL OIL, TITANIUM DIOXIDE, BHA,
FRAGRANCE, ULTRAMARINES (CI 77007)



Green Nosecoat

PETROLATUM, ZINC OXIDE, BEESWAX,
PARAFFIN, MINERAL OIL, TITANIUM DIOXIDE, BHA,
FRAGRANCE, YELLOW 10 LAKE (CI 47005)
CHROMIUM OXIDE GREENS (CI 77288)



White Nosecoat

PETROLATUM, ZINC OXIDE, BEESWAX,
PARAFFIN, MINERAL OIL, TITANIUM DIOXIDE, BHA,
FRAGRANCE



Yellow Nosecoat

PETROLATUM, ZINC OXIDE, BEESWAX,
PARAFFIN, MINERAL OIL, TITANIUM DIOXIDE, BHA,
FRAGRANCE, YELLOW 5 LAKE (CI 19140),
YELLOW 10 LAKE (CI 47005)



Red Nosecoat

PETROLATUM, ZINC OXIDE, BEESWAX,
PARAFFIN, MINERAL OIL, TITANIUM DIOXIDE, BHA,
FRAGRANCE, RED 6 LAKE (CI 15850), RED 7 LAKE (CI 15850),
RED 40 LAKE (CI 16035)



Black Nosecoat

PETROLATUM, ZINC OXIDE, BEESWAX,
PARAFFIN, MINERAL OIL, TITANIUM DIOXIDE, BHA,
FRAGRANCE, IRON OXIDES (CI 77489)



Army Green Nosecoat

PETROLATUM, ZINC OXIDE, BEESWAX,
PARAFFIN, MINERAL OIL, TITANIUM DIOXIDE, BHA,
FRAGRANCE, YELLOW 5 LAKE (CI 19140),
BLUE 1 LAKE (CI 42090), YELLOW 6 LAKE (CI 15985)



Orange Nosecoat

PETROLATUM, ZINC OXIDE, BEESWAX,
PARAFFIN, MINERAL OIL, TITANIUM DIOXIDE, BHA,
FRAGRANCE, ORANGE 4 (CI 15510), YELLOW 6 LAKE (CI 15985)
YELLOW 5 LAKE (CI 19140)



Lip Balm

ACTIVES:
OCTINOXATE (5.0%), OCTOCRYLENE (5.0%), OCTISALATE (5.0%) OXBENZONE (5.0%)
OTHERS:
MINERAL OIL, PETROLATUM, N&A FLAVOR CAPYLIC TRIGLYCERIDE, TITANIUM DIOXIDE VITAMIN E ACETATE, ALOE LEAF EXRACT STEARIC ACID, ALUMINUM HYDROXIDE IN A WAX BASE



Sunscreen Spray

ACTIVES:
BUTYL METHOXYDIBENZOYLMETHANE (3.0%), HOMOSALATE (15.0%) BENZOPHENONE-3 (5.0%), OCTOCRYLENE (2.0%), ETHYLHEXYL SALICYLATE (5.0%)
OTHER INGREDIENTS:
ZINC OXIDE, BUTANE, ALCOHOL DENAT, RETINYL PALMITATE, ZEA MAYS (CORN) OIL, CHOLECALCIFEROL, TOCOPHERYL ACETATE, PANTHENOL, TETRAHEXYLDECYL ASCORBATE , ASCORBYL PALMITATE, TAPIOCA STARCH, ACRYLATES/OCTYLACRYLAMIDE COPOLYMER, FRAGRANCE (PARFUM)



SPF 30

ACTIVES:
OCTINOXATE (5.0%) , ZINC OXIDE (7.5%)
NON-ACTIVES:
PURIFIED WATER USP, ISOPROPYL MYRISTATE, ISOPROPYL PALMITATE, PROPYLENE GLYCOL, CETYL PEG/PPG-10 DIMETHICONE, POLYGLYCERYL-4 ISOSTEARATE, HEXYL LAURATE, CETYL DIMETHICONE, TOCOPHERYL ACETATE, BEES WAX, HYDROGENATED CASTOR OIL, SODIUM CHLORIDE, EDTA DISODIUM, TRIETHOXYCAPRYLYLSILANE, METHYLPARABEN, PROPYLPARABEN



Face Stick

ACTIVES:
HOMOSALATE 6.9%, OCTINOXATE (4.7%), OCTISALATE (4.0%), OCTOCRYLENE (3.4%), ZINC OXIDE (5.0%)
NON-ACTIVES:
BHT, BUTYLOCTYL SALICYLATE, C 12-15 ALKYL BENZOATE, CAPRYLIC/CAPRIC TRIGLYCERIDE, CETYL ALCOHOL, FLAVOR, METHYLPARABEN, MICROCRYSTALLINE WAX, MODIFIED CORN STARCH, OZOKERITE, POLYETHYLENE, PROPYLPARABEN, PVP/HEXADECENE COPOLYMER, SYNTHETIC BEESWAX, TOCOPHEROL.

What's the difference between a Physical (inorganic) and a Chemical (organic) sunscreen?

Physical (inorganic)
Examples include:
Zinc Oxide and Titanium Dioxide
Chemical (organic)
Examples include: 
Octylcrylene, ayobenzone, octinoxate
octisalate, oxybenzone, homosalate, Mexoryl
How they work: Sit on top of the skin and  
reflect/block UV rays away from the skin.
How they work: Absorb UV rays before  
transferring them away from the skin via heat 
and energy.

What's the SPF of the Nosecoat?

It is a total block.  The color is meant to be seen on your skin and does not rub in.  This total
block uses 25% zinc oxide to completely block harmful UV rays.

When and how much sunscreen should I use?

Sunscreen should be used everyday and applied to dry skin 15 to 30 minutes prior to going outside.
Don't be shy, cover exposed skin generously and rub it in.  Reapply often, especially after swimming
and sweating.

Who needs sunscreen?

Everyone should use sunscreen.  The American Academy of Dermatology recommends that,
regardless of skin type, a broad spectrum (protects against UVA and UVB rays), water-resistant
sunscreen with a Sun Protection Factor (SPF) of at least 30 should be used year-round.

Why is Vitamin E (Tocopheryl Acetate) beneficial to have in your sunscreen?

Vitamin E enhances the body's ability to repair damage induced by UV radiation, is an anti-oxidant and soothes the skin.  All of Zinka's Clear Sunscreen products contain Vitamin E.

Will you sponsor me?

Please send a resume to info@zinka.com that includes, background information, all major competitions and places, travels, etc.
Also please provide pictures and videos for us to review.

Will you sponsor my event?

Can you please send us any press / promo material on the event to info@zinka.com?
Also, send answers to some of these questions:
- How many athletes will be competing / people will be attending?
- Will there be prizes? / How many divisions? / and How many places?
- Will there be a raffle / giveaway?
- Will there be goodie bags? / How many will be made?

Does your sunscreen contain nano-particles?
We have checked with our chemists in order to give you the most accurate information on nano-particles and all of our products are free of them.  In December of 2008 Consumer Reports Health did tests on five brands of sunscreen including Zinka.  We were the only company out of the five that was nano-particle free.  Check out their website at www.consumerreports.org to get more in depth information on the test.

Here is some more info on the concerns with nano-particles:

There has been speculation that physical sunscreen ingredients, like zinc oxide and titanium dioxide release nano-particles into the water.  When these particles settle, they can clog the pores of marine life like coral.  There is no conclusive data on this that I am aware of.

The self proclaimed "Environmental Working Group" publishes reports that basically associate something bad with every ingredient used for sunscreen.  If they don't someone else will.  There are no confirmed results of their findings.  Some believe the FDA doesn't regulate sunscreen, however that is completely false.  They pre-approve and publish a list of ingredients that can and can't be used in sunscreens.  If they deem an ingredient to be harmful then it will be removed.  These studies are inconclusive and don't take levels of percentages into play.  It is common knowledge to most that there have always been things that are healthy in certain doses and potentially not in large amount.

There will always be someone who says something is wrong with everything... 6 months later, they will change their mind to focus their attention on something else.  There is a lot of money spent behind the scenes by influential companies to try and swing customer perception towards their products and their respective ingredients.  This is very apparent when everyone was convinced that Mexoryl was the greatest thing to ever hit the US.  What they didn't advertise is the fact that it is impossible to stabilize it in a waterproof solution, so it's basically useless.  The latest buzz word that they are pounding is Helioplex.  This is just a combination of two active ingredients that are commonly found in a number of existing formulas... They basically just made up a new fancy word for something that has been used for a long time.

In conclusion, you will never satisfy 100% of the market and it is very expensive to try.  You need to be confident with your formula, the way it wears and its overall performance.  We have always operated under the notion that the most effective sunscreen is one that someone will actually wear.  It doesn't matter what a sunscreen contains or does if nobody will apply it because it feels like mud.  The notion that wearing no sunscreen at all is better than wearing certain sunscreens is absolutely ridiculous.  The market changes and so do the buzz words.

For what it's worth.. if you bottle a formula without nano-particles, then another contingent of people will complain that it doesn't have a physical block.  So far, it has proven impossible to please everyone with a single formula because someone is always coming out with a new test that says you should or shouldn't be doing on thing or another.